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. these are not attainable cuts without eventually rationing health care in america and rationing health care for our senior citizens who have earned these benefits and we have guaranteed them these benefits. and for the life of me how the aarp can support this 2,000-page legislation is beyond my imagination. seniors all over america and all over the state of arizona, including the 330,000 senior citizens in my state that are under the medicare advantage program, which is going to be drastically cut by som some $120 billion, are outraged. and the more they find out about it, the more angry they've become. so here we are, as my colleague from the great state of iowa and a leader on health care just articulated, in a totally partisan measure before the united states senate in which no member on this side of the aisle has been consulted in any way -- i would point out to my colleagues historically there has never been a major reform implemented by the congress of the united states unless it's by a -- unless it's bipartisan in nature and i don't believe that the american people want this 2,000-and-some-page mon
are going to vote on a bill which to me the people of america don't like. and you know who doesn't like it the most? seniors. you know why? they're concerned. they know medicare is being -- is going broke, and by the year 017, there will be $500 billion of cuts in medicare. and yet, the money that's being cut from medicare isn't being used to save medicare. it's to start a whole new program that's going to cause americans who have insurance to pay more. it's going to cause people that don't have any insurance to make it harder to get, or if they go to an emergency room, have to pay more, that bill is going to be higher. all because of what i believe is an irresponsible piece of legislation that is going to be a huge weight on our american economy at a time when you have 10.2% unemployment. but i see the senator from nevada has -- he has a similar copy of the bills next to him and he may want to chime in on what he is seeing in his home state and what he is hearing from people who live in nevada and the small businesses as well as the hospitals and providers. mr. ensign: if the senator w
from south america. we have ahmadinejad in good deal today and i want to know if this is a message to the u.s. that ahmadinejad can talk to other leaders of what the problem is here. >> will take the answer. >> okay, let me try that. attempts for your question at grand bargains, up until now hasn't worked too well. again, it's that suspicion, in the barriers of suspicion are just too high. when one side has come forward, the other side is drawn back. the u.s. made what i thought was a very reasonable offer back in 1999, 2000, in the last years of the clinton administration when secretary albright talked about a roadmap to better relations with no preconditions. and the iranians turned it down and most observers, non-american observer is basically said the iranians blew it. this was a good opportunity and they couldn't do it. in 2003, we have the same thing from the other -- from the other direction. i mean, it's a good idea. you can get all of these issues, all of these issues out there, but it may be too hard to do. so maybe it's those -- or at least, if not one at a time, at lea
it is to come back again. and now time has flown. and we're at the eighth. energy in america national policy conference, and what an honor it is to hold this annual review and think about where we're going in renewable energy in america here in the cannon caucus room. thank you for coming, and i hope you enjoy this day. i want to start by thanking the sponsors that have helped us produce the conference, ge and dow corning and next era energy and verizon. and believe it or not, that's the symbol of the danish embassy, the embassy of denmark, where we'll have a reception this evening. and thanks to ambassador peterson for being our host for that. it's a great place to go from here to think about where we're going next in copenhagen. and all of the other sponsors, berlin and smud, lockheed martin is in our space, the largest government contractor in the world, clean edge and ethanol biomass and biodiesel, all these other companies helped produce this, and we thank them. to begin, let me remind us that the theory of this conference is called phase ii, and what does that mean? well, in 19 -- in 2
safe. call it an osha deal, call it anything you want. but they go from being our youth in america to our employees. and we have, i believe, as americans, an obligation to make this a safer sport. >> i appreciate that. the last comment, mr. chairman, as i mentioned, you're not the only person, grant you, i have 7.5 and four kids and i think it's the parents role at the very early age to take care of the safety of their children. i certainly don't think the federal government has a role in intervene in that. but congress may have a role in making sure that there may be some funds for research and development. but getting involved in the every day operation of an nfl football team, congress is not qualified to do that. maybe we should do -- stick to what we know best. with that, thank you, mr. chairman. i'll yield back the remaining portion of my time. >> we discuss things. [laughter] >> debate. >> the chair is pleased now to recognize attorney -- or former subcommittee chair linda sanchez of california. >> is this on? yeah. thank you, mr. chairman. i want to start by making a commen
, and that is enough to scare them. and, in fact, all of america is concerned about this. a recent gla "usa today gallup"l shows that 61% of seniors disagree with cutting medicare reform. despite that they have moved ahead to pay for the new health insurance programs. they're suchly not listening to what americans have to say about -- simply not listening to what americans have to say about this. if democratic leaders have their way, hundreds of billions of dollars will be slashed from hospitals that treat seniors, from the medicare advantage program, from the nursing home care, home health care, hospice care. medicare faces a severe challenge, including a whopping $38 trillion in unfunded liabilities and insolvency by the year 2017. that's almost incomprehensible. in just a few short years years, $38 trillion in unfunded liabilities and insolvency. obviously seniors want us to fix that problem rather than raiding medicare to pay for a new health care program. and they want to preserve medicare advantage. i receive letters from worried seniors every day about the plan to cut medicare advantage, w
to america's highest court, reveals the building in exquisite detail through the eyes of supreme court justices. then friday at 8 p.m. eastern, the white house. inside america's most famous home. beyond the velvet ropes of public tours, our visit shows the grand public places as well as those rarely-seep space. -- seen spaces. and saturday at # p.m. eastern, the capitol, one of america's most symbolic structures. american icons, three memorable nights thursday, friday, and saturday at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span. and get your own copy of american icons, a three-disc dvd set. it's $24.95 plus shipping and handling. order online. >> now an event with john limbert, the newly appointed deputy assistant of state for iran. he was held hostage from 1979-1981. from the middle east institute in washington, this is just over an hour. >> quite an overflow crowd. this is all, i guess it's not unexpected, but i'll tell you the background to this invitation which is rather ironic. gives me great pleasure to introduce ambassador john limbert today, and he's here to discuss his very timely book, "negotia
is really aimed at trying to put out to america a greater sense of our own culture. and doing it in some very innovative ways. wanting a program called picturing america, which is looking at some of the great american painting and other artwork as kind of -- as items in and of themselves, and as items that can be used to advance an understanding of history itself. if you look at a historical painting, for example, a painting called the midnight ride of paul revere, which is by of course america's greatest artist, a fellow island named grant wood. [laughter] >> but it is a painting with humor and historical meaning. and from that painting, you can lead a discussion and a history class of the meaning of a moment in history, and what is important about that moment, and what relevance it has two of student in a class in idaho or iowa or new york city today. . . >> i am a great advocate of the university of iowa hawkeyes. great football season. almost a miracle one. but the interesting thing to me is how this team operated as a team. and then it had rivaled. and they respected the rivals, and
devastated by this. and i can tell you there's a whole crowd of people out there in america that are ready to be helpful to you and to us to solve this. >> so who does the technology and then i'll shut up? who does the technology? whose responsibility it? are we going to wait on detroit to do it or the chairman of the it? the secretary of transportation to do it, who is going to do this? >> look, mr. chairman, if you wanted to get into the technology business i'll give it a try. we can did in the enforcement business, the rule-making business, but i don't often chairman wants widowhood and the technology business. >> if ray lahood comes up with a good idea in the chairman doesn't,. >> will work with you, the committee, with secretary lahood to incentivize technologies that can solve this and solve it quickly. >> i hope so. i'm sorry i say to my ranking member because you may have other questions you want answered. >> mr. chairman, i don't have further questions, but i will say that i think this has been a spirited hearing. i think people have been engaged. i think our witnesses have been v
is separate from what people are voting on as policies. and we want him to succeed. he represents an america, an improved america. we don't want to go back to a more rationally deviced country. we don't want him to fail. but i think the dynamic for the next election is going to break pedal. you have the white house, the car has no brake. anking. you can take the price control mechanisms and instead of top-down putting them in washington, with three smart guys deciding how to save health care money, more market-oriented approach where you put price control mechanisms, patients and doctors, safeway's holding down the cost for quite a while. there are things you can do toward reform, shopping across state lines, there are lots of things you can do to empower some real market-based reforms. republicans have come forward with that and interestingly enough david axelrod said 80% of this we agree on. they could have taken that 80% and box something up and had it done by christmas. >> you referenced leadership. there is no -- no one speaks for the party, no leaders in the party, you heard that about
believe it can also work for distracted driving. by this time next year, every licensed driver in america, private and commercial should be far more aware of the risk and consequences of distracted driving than they are today. driving while distracted should feel wrong. just like driving without a seat belt or driving while intoxicated is wrong, seems wrong, should be wrong. we are not going to break everyone of their bad habits. but we are going to raise awareness. and sharpen the consequences. and with the help of all of the advocacy industry groups out there, we're going to change our culture to recognize that the distracted driving is personally irresponsible and socially unacceptable behavior. but in the end, it's important to recognize that we won't make the problem go away just by passing laws. as i said yesterday, you cannot simply legislate behavior, and expect to get the kinds of results we need to improve road safety. people need to use common sense. and show come common decency and consideration for all of the other drivers, passengers, and pedestrians out there. we need a hig
extremism. which is at odds with the values of america and its military and threatens the safety and security of the american people. i was in the pentagon on 9/11 and felt up close the horror of this extremism. as the army lost more soldiers and civilians that day than any day in the last eight years of war. i know our soldiers and families at fort hood are stung by this tragedy because their friends and loved ones were killed simply because of who they are and what they stand for. they were committed to defend this nation against the very extremism that killed them. radical islam and jihadist extremism is the most transformational issue i have dealt with in my military service and it continues to be so today. in my judgment, it is the most significant threat to the security of the american people that i have faced in my lifetime. we are a society that espouses tolerance and values diversity. and our military reflects those values. but at the same time, we must know what a threat looks like. and we must know what to do about it. thank you. and i look forward to your questions. >
clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america. but in the meantime, we're looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at a white house stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to investing in communities to help them respond to climate-related disease to slashing greenhouse gas emissions in our own buildings. this is not an afterthought from my department. this is a key part of our broader public health strategy. more and more we understand that health is not something that happens just in doctors' offices. whether you're healthy or not depends on what you eat and drink, what you breathe, how you get around and where you live. a world that's heating up and powered by coal-fired plants that fill the sky with harmful greenhouse gas is going to have fewer healthy people than a world that runs on
. >> there are over 8 million uninsured children in america. >> 8 million >> 8 million >> 8 million. >> saturday night as americans laid down for sleep, moderate democrats lay down their beliefs, sold out their constituents, ruled by pressure from barack obama and here he read they voted to move forward a government run health care bureau our nation does not want and can't afford. one member sold her vote to the highest bidder. one member sold out his principles. two more lost what little credibility they had on fiscal responsibility. another put the interest of the last of his party before his own state. another voted one way after saying she was for another. it's no wonder why democrats voted in the dead of night. ..
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14